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Friday, May 19, 2017

Here's what Asia's political strategist say about PH decision to cut EU aid

Here's what Asia's political strategist say about PH decision to cut EU aid
While it is a known that foreign is a tool for diplomacy, meant for the donor to influence or gain from the receiver, the proposed aide from the European Union was recommended by the Department of Finance on a specific aid package.

This was the sentiment of political strategist Malou Tiquia who clarified in her Facebook account that the recent offer of financial aid by the EU would not affect existing aid programs.



She quoted spokesperson Ernesto Abella as saying that the future aid packages would be on a case-to-case basis, as has often been the case.

Tiquia said that aid can serve diplomatic (military and political) purposes, developmental purposes, humanitarian relief or commercial purposes.

She said there are also varying classifications for aid, "aid can be a gift, a grant, a low or no interest loan, or a combination of these. The terms of foreign aid are oftentimes influenced by the motives of the giver: a sign of diplomatic approval, to reward a government for behaviour desired by the donor, to extend the donor's cultural influence, to enhance infrastructure needed by the donor for the extraction of resources from the recipient country, or to gain other kinds of commercial access." 

She said foreign aid is a tool for diplomacy.

"Conditionalities are often included in development aid, grants and loans. There should be an agreement between and among nations worked through levels of negos from donor leverage and recipient acceptance; from accession of fund through matching, and so many other forms," said.



Tiquia said that the apppoinment of Senator Ed Angara as Special Envoy to the EU is "most welcome" as it shows that the foreign entity remains an "important partner for the Philippines".

"EU is composed of 27 countries (less U.K.) with 15 countries having embassies in the PH. We continue to look at the bigger picture," Tiquia said.

Just recently however, President Rodrigo Duterte refused to accept the grant from the EU.

DFA spokesman Robespierre Bolivar said that they have not been informed of the details as to why the president refused to accept the aid.

Duterte is a known critic of the EU, which he repeatedly warned not to interfere with the Philippines' internal affairs, as the foreign body discouraged his war against illegal drugs and his desire to bring back the death penalty.



“If you think it is high time for you to withdraw your assistance,  go ahead, we will not beg for it,” Duterte said to the EU in October of last year.

EU Ambassador Franz Jessen said more than 250 million euros or roughly $278.7 million worth of grants could be at stake.

“We are still awaiting more detailed clarification from the government,” Jessen said .

 “The amount possibly concerned by the new decision is 250 million euro plus. For this year the amount affected could be 100 million euro," he added.

SOURCE: Malou Tiquia

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